Create a Rose using Bead Embroidery

KEY WORDS AND MEANINGS

Top of foundation means the front face of your project i.e. your actual design and the beaded area.

Back or bottom of foundation refers to the area of your project where all the stitching can be seen.

Reinforce means to go back through the beads you have just stitched to make the beads sit more uniformly.

Backstitch means that you push your needle through the previous stitch made at the back of the foundation.

Reposition means to position your needle at the back of the foundation ready to work your next bead/s.

Tie off means to form a knot at the back of your foundation in several places before trimming off your thread.

Adding new thread when required.

 

If you are getting short on thread at any point during your project, then tie off by pushing your needle to the back of your foundation. At the back of the foundation, push your needle through approximately

one millimetre of beading foundation and then under one of the thread bars. Form a knot around the thread bars in two separate places, then trim off the tail [See photo section “tying off thread”].

Start a new thread in the same way as you started i.e. by tying a triple knot at the bottom of the thread and then continue with your project as before.

TOP TIP: – To reposition your needle across a different part of your piece of work, there are a few options. You can stitch across the back, but if the gap is too far (making too big a stitch), you can either wrap thread under the thread bars at intervals or push your needle around the beads on the top of your foundation until you reach a suitable point to begin the next section.

TOP TIP: – Curve the edges of your foundation, by trimming with scissors. This will help to avoid catching your thread on the pointed corners.

 

TOP TIP: – Work with fewer groups of beads around the curved sections will allow you to get more distinct curves.

 

TOP TIP:- When reinforcing, you can go back through the stitches by just repositioning your needle approximately 1mm from where the previous hole (made through stitching the last bead). This will ensure that you do not undo your work.

Getting started & outlining the flower using A beads

 

Cut a length of approximately one metre of thread and thread your beading needle.  Tie a triple knot at the bottom of the thread.


Push your needle up through the back of the beading foundation, coming out on the right side of the flower along the outline, just above the printed leaves [Photo 1]. Add 4A beads and lay across the outer line (printed on the foundation). Push needle down to the back of the foundation where the fourth bead ends [Photo 2].

Back stitch by pushing needle at the back of the foundation into the previous hole made (in this instance it is the first hole made where the knot sits) [Photo 3].

 

Push your needle through the 4A seed beads just added, (on the front of your foundation) [Photo 4] then add 4A beads, continuing working along the bold outline of the flower [Photo 5].

TOP TIP:- When stitching near the printed leaves, ensure that you leave a small gap of 1 to 2mm to fit the row of beads that will be stitched in that area, later in the pattern.  

At the back, backstitch into previous stitch just made [Photo 6].  At the top of the foundation, push your needle through the 4A seed beads just added [Photo 7]. Repeat this process of adding 4A beads at a time, backstitching and pushing your needle through the 4 beads just added, until you reach the top of the right side (you will need to adjust the number of beads to fit and go just slightly over the top of the line to create a point to the top) [Photo 8].

Reposition your needle (from the back of the foundation, to the front) [Photo 9] where the adjoining slanted line begins (ensure that your needle sits between the two base lines as shown in the photo)                    [Photos 10 to 11].

 

We are now going to reinforce all the beads we have added in this step. To do this bring your needle from the back to the front of the foundation, (at the base of the short line just stitched), then make your way around all the beads as shown. This will help your beads to sit more uniformly [Photos 12 to 15].

Now reposition your needle at the back of the foundation, bringing it up to the top of the foundation and start stitching (using the same techniques of adding 4 beads at a time) in the long centre line that curves off to the left (just above the group of leaves) [Photo 16].  Stitch until you come to the end of the curved line and once you have completed the line, reposition your needle ready to stitch the top of the rose [Photo 17].

In order to get more detail at the top, I suggest using the same technique as before, but working in groups of 2 to 3 beads at a time rather than 4. Stitch along the top line using this technique. Reinforce this line of beads [Photo 18].

We will leave the left of centre inner outline, for completion after we have outlined/filled the leaf shapes.

Reposition your needle ready to stitch the curved line under the top line as shown [Photo 19]. Again, use smaller groups of beads to create more distinct curves. Reinforce this line of stitching.

Reposition your needle ready to stitch the final printed outline of the flower, on the far left side. Ensure that you leave a small gap when stitching near the leaf outline, to ensure you have enough room to add the seed beads for this, later in the pattern [Photo 20].

Once stitched, reinforce by going back through the beads in this line.

TOP TIP:- When stitching near the leaves, ensure that you leave a small gap of 1 to 2 mm to fit the row of beads that will be stitched later.  

 

TOP TIP:- In this section we are only working on the outline – all the finer details will be filled in later.

Forming the leaves using B beads

 

TOP TIP:- When repositioning your needle in this section, to avoid undoing your previous stitch, position the needle approximately 1mm from the previous hole/stitch.

 

First, we will stitch the leaf on the right. Notice how the leaves blend into each other, with three full leaves and a part line (which will be covered by the first leaf). To construct the leaves, we stitch a single seed at the base and the tip of the leaf, then fill in either side. Finally, we use horizontal stitches to anchor down, to create a stable leaf shape.  

Bring your needle up in the centre base as shown [Photo 21]. Add 1B bead, stitch this in place, so that the bead holes sit horizontally, but at a slight angle [Photo 22].

Stitch another single 1B bead at the tip of this leaf as shown [Photo 23] (positioning at the tip of the lower right leaf).  Come back up at the base of this seed bead, (around a millimetre from the previous hole to ensure you don’t undo your work) push your needle through the 1B bead and add 5B beads                  [Photos 24 to 25]. Push your needle through the first B bead added in this step. Push the needle the back of the foundation and come up at the tip of the leaf ready to go through the 1B bead at the tip.

Now go through the B bead [Photo 26] and add 5B beads, (to form the other side of the leaf) again anchoring down in the B bead at the base of the leaf [Photo 27].

Push your needle to the back of the foundation [Photo 28].

To create a more distinct point to the leaf, stitch a B bead on its side (so that the bead hole sits vertically) at the leaf tip.

Stitch 3B beads in the centre of the leaf [Photo 29], running from the bottom centre to top centre of the two floating rows just stitched.

Finally place a single horizontal stitch across (halfway along the line of beads) each of long free flowing bead lines, to anchor down [Photo 30].

TOP TIP:- Stretch out the lower line of the leaf, so that it goes a little below the printed leaf.  The top of the leaf will cover a portion of the part printed leaf. We will not be stitching a 4th leaf.

Make the second leaf  (bottom left):-

Stitch a single B bead at the bottom and tip of the leaf as before. Repeat the same process, but this time add 4B beads for each side of the leaf with 2B beads stitched in the centre of the leaf [Photos 31 to 33].

Again, to create a more distinct point to the leaf, stitch a B bead on its side (so that the bead hole sits vertically) at the leaf tip.

 

Make the third leaf (left of centre):-
Again stitch a single B bead at the bottom (where shown and position the bead at a slight lilt to the left) and a single B bead at the top. Repeat as before but this time add 3B beads for each side of the leaf with 1B bead stitched in the centre of leaf.

As before to create a more distinct point the leaf, stitch a B bead on its side (so that the bead hole sits vertically) at the leaf tip [Photos 34 to 42].

Completing the inner curved outline using A beads

Reposition your needle in the gap between leaf two and three where the long bold line starts. Stitch all the way up using the same method as before.  When you reach the top, stitch in between the two bold lines where they separate slightly. Reinforce from top to bottom of the line just stitched [Photo 43].

Filling the flower petals using C & D beads

 

Form vertical lines using main C beads and D beads in the smaller gaps using the same methods as before.

First start filling in the right petal:-

I suggest making three rows of mainly C beads to fill the right petal. Fill any gaps using D beads        [Photos 43 to 44].

TOP TIP:- Do not overfill your petals, as this may cause, distortion on the shape. It is much easier to fill in the gaps after all vertical lines have been stitched.

 

TOP TIP:- Reinforce each row from top of the line to the bottom, ready to start the next row.

TOP TIP:- Should you need to pull in your stitches slightly, you can place the odd horizontal stitch across you line of work.

Fill the small middle section:-

Working to the left of the centre line, make a row of mainly C beads and use D beads in the tighter places. Reinforce the row just stitched.  Fill the gap to the right of this row, using D beads [Photos 44 to 46].

Fill the left petal:-

Working from the left of the bold outline, continue as before by stitching vertical lines.

On the second vertical row in this petal, you may need to start with a D bead and also switch to D beads part way up. Adjust the number of beads to fit the space.

Make a short third vertical row of around 4 D beads.

Fill the remaining gap left, using the required combination of C and D beads [Photos 47 to 48].

Filling the top of the flower using C and D beads

 

First, begin working the gap at top right of centre. Start working from right to left in this particular gap. The first two rows          I have used C beads and the small third row using D beads. You will need to adjust this to fit your own piece [Photo 48].

In the final gap, top left, start working from the left with the beads sitting slightly slanted. Again, use a combination of C and D beads to fit.  You will not require many beads for this section [Photo 49].

Finally fill in any gaps in your piece using D beads [Photo 50].

Tie off

 

Tie off your thread using the same method shown previously. 

Trim off the excess foundation

TOP TIP:- Cut from the back to ensure you avoid trimming through your stitches. Trim as close as you can to the stitches, without cutting into them.

 

Using a pair of small scissors, (ideally sharp embroidery scissors), trim off the excess foundation         [Photo 51].

 

TOP TIP: -If you have a permanent marker in a matching colour to the beads stitched in this section, it helps to colour in the beading foundation, to reduce the amount of white space seen after stitching.

I suggest using a test piece to check the colour match first [Photo 52].

Adding your faux backing & glue bail or brooch back

 

Using E6000 glue (or a suitable alternative that will dry clear and suitable for fabric), add a thin layer of glue to the back of the piece and glue onto the faux backing [Photos 53 to 54].  Once dry trim off the excess faux backing and glue on your bail (if wearing as a necklace) or a brooch back (if using as a brooch pin).  Notice that there are two photos showing options of where to glue your bail for a pendant, or a brooch back – the choice is yours [Photos 55 to 56].

Adding your chain (optional)

 

First, cut the chain to suit your required length, then push the chain through the bail just added (but ensure you give the bail 10 minutes for the glue to set). You can then add the components to your chain, with a clasp one end (open the ring attached to the bolt clasp) and a jump ring on the other end [Photos 57 to 60].                        

 

Your piece is now complete!

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